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Italy 20 lire  1957 to 2001Italy 20 lire 1957 to 2001 Token: Rome Claudio Novelty Token: Rome Claudio Novelty
Token: US Guardian Angel Good Luck Token: US Guardian Angel Good Luck Singapore Dollar  1987 to DateSingapore Dollar 1987 to Date
Token: US Aladdin's Castle Arcade Token: US Aladdin's Castle Arcade China Kiangnan (Kiang-Nan) 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents and 1 dollar  1898 to 1901China Kiangnan (Kiang-Nan) 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents and 1 dollar 1898 to 1901
  

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Peru Real, Centavo, Dinero, Sol  1859 to 1935

Peru minted these nice-looking coins in silver between 1859 and 1935. They all use the same seated lady/pedestal/wreath/shield pattern, but they come in different denominations. The same pattern is used on some copper and gold coins, but this page applies only to silver coins between 1859 and 1935.

Here are the denominations and relevant statistics:

1/2 (MEDIO) REAL 1858-1861 14 mm diameter 0.038 troy ounces silver
REAL 1859-1861 17 mm diameter 0.72 troy ounces silver

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Mexico 8 Reales  1824 to 1897

Hi Deb -- You probably have a well-worn 8 reales coin from the old Republic of Mexico.

These coins contain 0.786 troy ounces of silver. So that sets the minimum value they can attain. For instance, if silver is selling at $12 per troy ounce (look it up for today's price at kitco.com), the minimum price is 0.786 x 12 = $9.40.

Coins with the liberty cap and starburst pattern were minted in smaller denominations than 8 reales. In fact, denominations of 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 reales look the same, only smaller. The denomination appears explicitly on the coin in the place where '8R' appears on the 8 reales. Look for '1/2R', '1R', '2R', or '4R' on your coin and, if you have one, click to this appraisal page.

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Great Britain 25 New Pence (Silver Jubilee)  1977

On the 25th anniversary of her reign, Queen Elizabeth issued this coin with the denomination 25 new pence. She looks very sporty on that horse, I'd say.

Most of these were issued in copper nickel and are worth a few US dollars to collectors if they are in good shape. A total of 377,000 coins were issued in proof silver, like our picture, and these retail around the $25 mark, maybe more or less as the price of silver goes up and down.

The silver proofs contain 0.841 troy ounces of silver, so multiply the current price of silver by 0.841 to find the coin's value today. If, for example, silver is selling at $20 US dollars per troy ounce (look it up on kitco.com), then the coin's value is 0.841 x 20 = $16.80.

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Russia Rouble (Romanov Dynasty)  1913

This is a czar Nicholas II 'Romanov Dynasty' rouble struck by the St. Petersburg mint, a popular one-year type commemorating the 300th Anniversary of the Russia's ruling family, the Romanov Dynasty. By 1917 the Romanov Dynasty came to an end when the Russian Empire dissolved to the Marxist Bolsheviks, paving the way for the Soviet Union.

These coins contain 0.579 troy ounces of silver, but their numismatic (coin collector) value out-shadows their silver value:

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US New Hampshire Copper (Counterfeit)  1776

William Moulton (WM on the coin) was empowered by the newly formed House of Representatives to make a copper coin in 1776. Not much more is known about these coins. They did not appear in circulation. If you should have a genuine New Hampshire copper, it is essentially priceless, worth 100s of 1000s of dollars. The counterfeits are worth zero.

However, it is essentially impossible to find such a coin. In China, and other emerging free-market countries, counterfeiters are enjoying their regulation-free atmosphere and flooding the market with fake rare coins. That is, in all probability, what you have. It is worth a few US dollars as a novelty, even if it does not carry the COPY inscription which is mandated in the US, but not in many other countries.

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Ancient Rome Constantine I Follis with Jupiter  306AD to 337AD

That's Roman emperor Constantine I (the great) Flavius Valerius Constantinus Auguste (IMP FL VAL CONSTANTINVS AVG) on the front of this billon follis (about 5 grams), with Roman god Jupiter on the back, holding Victory.

The wonderful example in our picture comes from cgb.fr in Paris, where it sold for 195 euros (about $210 US dollars) during a 2008 auction. As always, CoinQuest is grateful to cgb.fr for use of their coin photo. It's a beauty!

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France 20 and 50 Francs  1950 to 1958

In the old days, before 1950, French 20 and 50 franc coins were minted in gold. Nice! But they later switched to aluminum-bronze. The 20 and 50 franc coins look the same except, of course, for the big 20 or 50 on the back side. The values below are for most (common) dates:

20 AND 50 FRANCS (COMMON DATES)
worn: less than $1 US dollar approximate catalog value
average circulated: $1
well preserved: $3
fully uncirculated: $10

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Bahamas Coinage  1966 to Date

There are about 3000 individual islands in the archipelao of the Bahamas. It is a British Crown Colony. Decimal coinage started there in 1966, and many of the designs are really quite interesting and well-done. The 10 cent coin has wavy edges, and the 15 cent coin is square. All others are round. Denominations range from one cent all the way to (are you ready?) 2500 dollars. The $2500 coins are 58 mm in diameter (an old US silver dollar is 38 mm) and made with 12 troy ounces of gold.

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