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Ireland Half Penny  1971 to 1986Ireland Half Penny 1971 to 1986 Early India 1 Dokdo (Princely State of Nawanagar)  1570Early India 1 Dokdo (Princely State of Nawanagar) 1570
Poland 5 Zlotych (3/4 Ruble) and 10 Zlotych (1 1/2 Rubles)  1833 to 1841Poland 5 Zlotych (3/4 Ruble) and 10 Zlotych (1 1/2 Rubles) 1833 to 1841 Germany 50 Pfennig  1919 to 1922Germany 50 Pfennig 1919 to 1922
Germany States Brunswick-Luneburg-Calenburg-Hannover 4 Pfennig  1762 to 1804Germany States Brunswick-Luneburg-Calenburg-Hannover 4 Pfennig 1762 to 1804 World Valuable Coins (All Countries)  1948 to DateWorld Valuable Coins (All Countries) 1948 to Date
Canada 1 Cent Commemorative  1967Canada 1 Cent Commemorative 1967 Singapore 20 Cents  1985 to 1993Singapore 20 Cents 1985 to 1993
  

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Germany 10 Pfennig (Iron or Zinc)  1916 to 1922

Now look closely. Does your coin look exactly like the coin in my picture? If so, you may have a valuable coin.

But, it is more likely that your coin is slightly different, especially in the beads that go around the eagle. If your coin has the beads, great! That's the first step in having a valuable coin. If there are no beads, the coin value declines to $1 or $2 US dollars, even in good condition, and won't climb above $10 unless fully, absolutely uncirculated.

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France Indo China Piastre, 10, 20, 50 Cents (Fakes are possible)  1885 to 1946

I don't know where Miss Liberty's tail came from, but it sure is hard to ignore! See below for more information on Liberty's tail.

French Indo China is Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia today. They issued several denominations of coin with the tailed Liberty design on the front of the coin and the specific denomination on the back. The 10 cents is the smallest, and the piastre is a large coin the size of a US silver dollar. All these coins are made of silver with various purities (e.g., TITRE 90 = 90% pure). Some of the value of these coins comes from this precious metal they contain:

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Token: Great Britain 1 Shilling 6 Pence and 3 Shilling  1812 to 1816

In the early 1800s, small silver coinage was in short supply for Great Britain. In an attempt to alleviate demand, the Bank of England began producing its own tokens. This article focuses on tokens with the design seen in our photo - a laureate head of George III on the obverse and the legend within a wreath on the reverse.

These bank tokens are made of sterling silver. The first was worth 1 shilling 6 pence, or 18 pence. The second token was worth 3 shillings. Both are worth considerably more today. Here is a breakdown of values:

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India (British) Pice  1943 to 1947

It's hard to miss this coin. The giant hole in the middle makes it very unusual. These were minted by the British about the time they were leaving India in 1947. The Portuguese were there until 1961.

These coins are worth very little. There were hundreds of millions made and many are still around due to their unique characteristics. But, as is often the case in coin collecting, there is a twist.

Here are the normal catalog values:

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Spain 5, 25, and 50 Pesetas  1957

The 1957 5, 25, and 50 pesetas coins from Spain are ones that can get collector juices flowing. The vast majority of these coins are very common, low-value pieces. These coins are made of copper-nickel and are worth only face value. A collector might pay a few US dollars to add a fully uncirculated specimen to his or her collection.

ALL COINS EXCEPT THOSE DESCRIBED BELOW:
worn: less than $1 US dollar approximate catalog value
average circulated: less than $1

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Token: US California Fractional Gold Fake (Counterfeit)  1852 to 1857

This page shows two of the most common fake California Gold pieces, dated 1852 and 1857, but there are oodles more fakes.

The numismatic (coin collecting) specialty area known as US California Fractional Gold is highly sophisticated and very complex. Genuine pieces are tiny and valuable, and they may appear crude and poorly made. It is not surprising, then, that crooks and shysters choose this area as fertile ground for ripping off collecting novices. Don't be a victim.

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Thu, 11-Feb-2016 06:26:52 GMT, unknown: 9310991