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US Missing Clad Layer (Minting error)  1965 to Date
US Missing Clad Layer (Minting error) 1965 to Date

Nowadays not many people remember when silver coins actually circulated in America. Up to 1964, our silver coins ~ dimes, quarters, half dollars ~ were made of actual silver. A full 90 percent of each coin was pure silver. The remaining 10 percent was copper. Then, in 1964, the Federal Government decided, with the rest of the world (pretty much), to do away with precious metal in coins and strike them out of cheap alloys. Coins minted from 1965 until now have zero silver content. Dimes, quarters, and half dollars are made of copper with a thin clad layer of nickel.

(Aside -- With the economic turmoil of today, do you think anything would be different if we used real precious metal in coins? Hmmmm.)

If you have old pre-1965 silver coins they are quite valuable today. See this CoinQuest link for details.

Once in a while the thin nickel clad layer is not attached to the coin blank when it is sent into the minting machine. What you get is a clad layer missing error coin and these are sought by collectors. Mint workers are supposed to catch all such errors before the coins leave the mint, but some get through.

Evaluating these coins is a bit tricky. There are several factors which enter into the equation, and all factors are subject to wide variations.

First there is eye appeal. To be valuable, an error coin has to knock your socks off to be valuable. The dime in our picture does that. The obverse ('heads' side) is almost uncirculated, fully lustrous, and pure white, while the reverse ('tails side') has a bright, lustrous red look from the exposed copper. To keep coins in such beautiful condition, owners usually send them to professional coin encapsulation services like PCGS, NGC, ANACS, and ICG (don't use other services).

NEVER CLEAN A COIN. CLEANING RUINS VALUE.

Second there is the actual error configuration. The nickel layer may be missing on one side or both, and it may be partially missing of fully missing.

Third, if you want to sell your coin, you need to find a buyer. There are not many collectors of error coins, so the unavailability of buyers can send prices lower.

Taking these into account, here are some best-guess estimates of the value of missing clad coins:

FULL EYE APPEAL, FULLY UNCIRCULATED, IN NUMISMATIC SLAB:

ONE SIDE MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER

Dimes: $200
Quarters: $300
Half dollars: $500
Ike dollars: $600
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $300

ONE SIDE MISSING PARTIAL CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $100
Quarters: $150
Half dollars: $250
Ike dollars: $300
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $200

TWO SIDES MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $400
Quarters: $500
Half dollars: $800
Ike dollars: $1000
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $700

CIRCULATED COIN, DULL, WORN, DARK COLORS:

ONE SIDE MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER

Dimes: $20
Quarters: $30
Half dollars: $50
Ike dollars: $60
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $30

ONE SIDE MISSING PARTIAL CLAD LAYER

Dimes: $10
Quarters: $15
Half dollars: $25
Ike dollars: $30
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $20

TWO SIDES MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $40
Quarters: $50
Half dollars: $80
Ike dollars: $100
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $70

These ballpark values are for retail sales to collectors. If you have such a coin and want to sell it to a coin dealer, figure the dealer will offer your about one-half retail value.

Coin: 4879 , Genre: Errors
Requested by: Gail Bogart, Thu, 15-Jul-2010 12:55:26 GMT
Answered by: Paul, Sun, 21-Apr-2013 12:52:46 GMT
Reviewed by CoinQuest. Appraisal ok., Sat, 24-Oct-2015 20:59:44 GMT
Requester description: 1986 This quarter is a copper quarter from 1986 it is missing the silver alloy from the denver mint which indicates that it was a
Tags: us usa missing miss clad layer error missed erors errors quarter copper silver denver mint coppers bronze coppery brass cupro siliver sliver argent silber silverish slver silb nickel nickels nickle nichel nichol nikel

Comments

I have a1988 D dime. Seems that both sides are copper. I learned about these today. My question is. Will dimes tarnish and look like copper? - Matthew
It's possible, albeit much more likely to happen with a silver dime - if you'd like us to have a look at your coin, please click on the 'Contact' button to start an email exchange. - CoinQuest (Todd)

I see nothing in you clad layer section about a nickle. I have one with one side missing clad layer. Is it worth anything. 2014P - Dante
Nickels aren't included because they aren't clad - they are copper-nickel all the way through. If a layer is missing on one side of your coin, my best guess would be that it has some type of environmental damage that corroded it. It's hard to say without looking at it; if you'd like to send us some photos, please CLICK HERE and you'll be able to upload them for us. Thanks! - CoinQuest (Todd)

I have a copper or bronze looking quarter is it worth anything? - Mike
If it's missing any or all of the clad layer, it has some collector value. If you'd like us to have a look at it, please CLICK HERE and you'll be able to upload photos for us to check out. Thanks! - CoinQuest (Todd)

I have a circulated 2002 Tennessee State quarter that is missing the clad layer on both sides. Where should I take it to be authenticated near Indianapolis, IN? - Nathan
Lost Dutchman Rare Coins is a respected Indianapolis dealer. You can submit your coin through them to one of the top two grading/authentication companies (PCGS or NGC). - CoinQuest (Todd)

I have a 1980 D dime the face looks almost new but the back looks all beat up and it looks as if its missing all the clad but how do I know forsure the worth of it? Thank you

  

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Mon, 27-Jun-2016 20:14:33 GMT, unknown: 2430824