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Your Source for Coin Values

Free appraisals are available until 3 requests are pending.
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Ireland Half Penny  1971 to 1986Ireland Half Penny 1971 to 1986 Russia Rouble  1895 to 1900Russia Rouble 1895 to 1900
New Zealand 3 Pence  1933 to 1965New Zealand 3 Pence 1933 to 1965 Early India 1 Dokdo (Princely State of Nawanagar)  1570Early India 1 Dokdo (Princely State of Nawanagar) 1570
Poland 5 Zlotych (3/4 Ruble) and 10 Zlotych (1 1/2 Rubles)  1833 to 1841Poland 5 Zlotych (3/4 Ruble) and 10 Zlotych (1 1/2 Rubles) 1833 to 1841 Germany 50 Pfennig  1919 to 1922Germany 50 Pfennig 1919 to 1922
Germany States Brunswick-Luneburg-Calenburg-Hannover 4 Pfennig  1762 to 1804Germany States Brunswick-Luneburg-Calenburg-Hannover 4 Pfennig 1762 to 1804 World Valuable Coins (All Countries)  1948 to DateWorld Valuable Coins (All Countries) 1948 to Date
  

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Canada 1 Cent Commemorative  1967

Yo, Ape -- Only if your coin is in superb numismatic (coin collector) condition, like the one in our picture, would a collector be willing to pay a premium for it. Maybe $1 or $2 US. Otherwise your coin is worth face value. It commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Confederation.

Coin: 2270
Requested by: ape, Mon, 14-Dec-2009 01:05:14 GMT

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Singapore 20 Cents  1985 to 1993

Your coin is worth face value, Barbara. A collector might pay a couple US dollars to add a fully uncirculated example to his or her collection. The picture shows a proof coin from Singapore. These are minted especially for collectors and never see regular circulation. It turns out the proof Singapore 20 cents is made of 92.5% pure silver (sterling silver) and therefore gets value from its bullion content, about $3.60 for silver at around $23 per troy ounce. Use a website like kitco.com to find the current price of silver - it changes every day.

Coin: 885
Requested by: barbara, Mon, 03-Aug-2009 15:22:32 GMT

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Germany 10 Pfennig (Iron or Zinc)  1916 to 1922

Now look closely. Does your coin look exactly like the coin in my picture? If so, you may have a valuable coin.

But, it is more likely that your coin is slightly different, especially in the beads that go around the eagle. If your coin has the beads, great! That's the first step in having a valuable coin. If there are no beads, the coin value declines to $1 or $2 US dollars, even in good condition, and won't climb above $10 unless fully, absolutely uncirculated.

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France Indo China Piastre, 10, 20, 50 Cents (Fakes are possible)  1885 to 1946

I don't know where Miss Liberty's tail came from, but it sure is hard to ignore! See below for more information on Liberty's tail.

French Indo China is Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia today. They issued several denominations of coin with the tailed Liberty design on the front of the coin and the specific denomination on the back. The 10 cents is the smallest, and the piastre is a large coin the size of a US silver dollar. All these coins are made of silver with various purities (e.g., TITRE 90 = 90% pure). Some of the value of these coins comes from this precious metal they contain:

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Token: Great Britain 1 Shilling 6 Pence and 3 Shilling  1812 to 1816

In the early 1800s, small silver coinage was in short supply for Great Britain. In an attempt to alleviate demand, the Bank of England began producing its own tokens. This article focuses on tokens with the design seen in our photo - a laureate head of George III on the obverse and the legend within a wreath on the reverse.

These bank tokens are made of sterling silver. The first was worth 1 shilling 6 pence, or 18 pence. The second token was worth 3 shillings. Both are worth considerably more today. Here is a breakdown of values:

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India (British) Pice  1943 to 1947

It's hard to miss this coin. The giant hole in the middle makes it very unusual. These were minted by the British about the time they were leaving India in 1947. The Portuguese were there until 1961.

These coins are worth very little. There were hundreds of millions made and many are still around due to their unique characteristics. But, as is often the case in coin collecting, there is a twist.

Here are the normal catalog values:

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