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Ancient Rome Octavian Denarius (Oxen)  28BC and 27BCAncient Rome Octavian Denarius (Oxen) 28BC and 27BC US Susan B Anthony Dollar  1979 to 1999US Susan B Anthony Dollar 1979 to 1999
Iceland 10 Aurar and 25 Aurar  1940 to 1942Iceland 10 Aurar and 25 Aurar 1940 to 1942 China Dollar (Yuan) with Junk  1932 to 1934China Dollar (Yuan) with Junk 1932 to 1934
Ancient Greece (Phonecia) Shekel of Tyre  126BC to 65ADAncient Greece (Phonecia) Shekel of Tyre 126BC to 65AD India 1/4, 1/2, and 1 Rupee  1862 to 1947India 1/4, 1/2, and 1 Rupee 1862 to 1947
  

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Australia Penny  1938 to Date

Like all British coins, the reigning monarch appears on the obverse (the 'heads' side). King George VI appears in our picture, but your coin might be different. Queen Elizabeth appears after 1952.

Except for the penny dated 1946, all Australian pennies in this series are worth face value or somewhat more when old and in excellent condition. Here are some catalog values for all coins except as noted below:

PENNY 1938 TO 1953 (EXCEPT AS NOTED BELOW)

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Great Britain Pound  1983 to Date

Starting in 1983 the UK standardized the 1 pound coin as shown in our pictures. The bust of Queen Elizabeth changes after 1983, and the reverse side changes from time to time. All the coins you find in circulation are made of nickel-brass and are worth face value: one pound in the UK. You can use xe.com to figure exchange rates between currencies of various countries.

In addition to the business strike coins produced for circulation, the Royal Mint also produced proof coins for collectors. You can see the sharp difference between the proofs and business strikes by considering our secondary picture. Four the the coins are proofs; one is a business strike. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see the difference!

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US Confederate Half Dollar  1861

Well, Heather ...

Either you have a very valuable coin, or you have one that is worth nothing. How's that for narrowing it down?!

During the Civil War, the Confederate (southern) States of America issued only two types of coinage: a one cent piece and a half dollar. (See our write-up on the one cent piece at this CoinQuest link.) They minted very few of each, so if you have a genuine, original CSA half dollar, you have a coin worth tens of thousands of US dollars today. Genuine CSA half dollars are so rare that the coin catalogs do not even list an estimated value! The coin in our main is a genuine piece.

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Spain 5, 25, and 50 Pesetas  1957

The 1957 5, 25, and 50 pesetas coins from Spain are ones that can get collector juices flowing. The vast majority of these coins are very common, low-value pieces. These coins are made of copper-nickel and are worth only face value. A collector might pay a few US dollars to add a fully uncirculated specimen to his or her collection.

ALL COINS EXCEPT THOSE DESCRIBED BELOW:
worn: less than $1 US dollar approximate catalog value
average circulated: less than $1

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Mexico 8 Reales  1824 to 1897

Hi Deb -- You probably have a well-worn 8 reales coin from the old Republic of Mexico.

These coins contain 0.786 troy ounces of silver. So that sets the minimum value they can attain. For instance, if silver is selling at $12 per troy ounce (look it up for today's price at kitco.com), the minimum price is 0.786 x 12 = $9.40.

Coins with the liberty cap and starburst pattern were minted in smaller denominations than 8 reales. In fact, denominations of 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 reales look the same, only smaller. The denomination appears explicitly on the coin in the place where '8R' appears on the 8 reales. Look for '1/2R', '1R', '2R', or '4R' on your coin and, if you have one, click to this appraisal page.

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France Indo China Piastre, 10, 20, 50 Cents  1885 to 1946

I don't know where Miss Liberty's tail came from, but it sure is hard to ignore! See below for more information on Liberty's tail.

French Indo China is Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia today. They issued several denominations of coin with the tailed Liberty design on the front of the coin and the specific denomination on the back. The 10 cents is the smallest, and the piastre is a large coin the size of a US silver dollar. All these coins are made of 90 percent (titre 0.900) silver, and some of the value comes from this precious metal:

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Token: US Guardian Angel Good Luck

Hi Matthew.

From your description, it sounds like you have a medal or token, not a coin. A coin will normally list the country it was minted it, its denomination, and the date of issue. You have not described your item as having any text or numbers - this is usually a tell-tale sign of a medal or token.

We have taken our best guess about your item. There are plenty of coin-like objects with angels on them, so this may not be your piece, but this one is quite common and fits your description. It is made of gold-colored base metal.

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US Morgan Silver Dollar  1878 to 1921

Hello Bianca -- You have a silver dollar designed by a man named George Morgan, so collectors call coins like yours Morgan Dollars. They are highly prized collectibles.

Your 1901O specimen is a 'common date' coin like most of the dates and mint marks in this series. 1921 is the most common of the common dates, as there were hundreds of millions of the 1921 coins made. Coins with better dates, not common dates, are listed below. They are more valuable.

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