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Germany 50 Reichspfennig with Swastika  1938 and 1939Germany 50 Reichspfennig with Swastika 1938 and 1939 South Africa Royal Visit Medal  1947South Africa Royal Visit Medal 1947
Medal: Japan Commemoration of Gold Standard  1912Medal: Japan Commemoration of Gold Standard 1912 Spain 1, 2, and 4 Maravedis  1718 to 1746Spain 1, 2, and 4 Maravedis 1718 to 1746
Great Britain Trade Dollar  1895 to 1935Great Britain Trade Dollar 1895 to 1935 Great Britain Penny and Half Penny  1902 to 1910Great Britain Penny and Half Penny 1902 to 1910
  

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US Confederate Half Dollar  1861

Well, Heather ...

Either you have a very valuable coin, or you have one that is worth nothing. How's that for narrowing it down?!

During the Civil War, the Confederate (southern) States of America issued only two types of coinage: a one cent piece and a half dollar. (See our write-up on the one cent piece at this CoinQuest link.) They minted very few of each, so if you have a genuine, original CSA half dollar, you have a coin worth tens of thousands of US dollars today. Genuine CSA half dollars are so rare that the coin catalogs do not even list an estimated value! The coin in our main is a genuine piece.

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US New England Colonial Coinage  1652 to 1682

In early New England, corn, pelts, bullets, and wampum were frequently used in lieu of coins. The British colonial General Court in 1652 ordered the first metallic currency struck: the New England silver threepence, sixpence, and shilling, lagging the Spaniards who had established a mint in Mexico City in 1535.

Not surprisingly, New England coinage today is very rare and very valuable. Also not surprisingly, many counterfeit New England pieces were made, and are still being made.

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France 5 Francs  1933 to 1950

I like French coins. The designs are always interesting, artistic, and well done. This design is no exception.

Your coin, dated 1945, is worth between $1 and $10 catalog value, depending on mint mark. Look at the bottom of the coin on the reverse. If you see a small C, you have the $10 coin. Otherwise it's the $1. These are inflated catalog values. Be sure to check the meaning of 'catalog' using the Important Terminology link.

There are other dates and mint marks of this coin that carry a good deal of collector value due to low mintages. Specifically, the 1936, 1937, 1938, and 1939 coins but only if they are made of nickel. There are others with these dates that are made of aluminum bronze that are low value, however. Also, the 1952 date in aluminum catalogs at $100 in average circulated condition.

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Ancient Greece (Egypt) Ptolemaic Kings Bronze Obols  305BC to 30AD

The Ptolemies came from a royal Greek family, and were the rulers of Egypt from 305 to 30 BC. Their coins commonly feature a curly-haired, bearded bust of Zeus right, portrayed with rams horns. The horned Zeus, or 'Zeus Ammon', was a deity worshiped by some ancient Greek Egyptians. The Egyptian deity Amun-Ra was portrayed with ram's horns, and the ancient Greeks identified him with Zeus. In this way the bust nicely ties together traditional Egyptian beliefs with the Greek pantheon.

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Colombia 16 Pesos  1837 to 1853

Yo, Charlie,

I am relieved to hear that your coin is authenticated, graded, and encapsulated by the Numismatic Guarantee Company (NGC). Many of the inquiries we get for truly rare coins are very likely counterfeits from China. Yours, obviously, is not. NGC stands behind their coins.

My Krause Mischler Standard Catalog of World Coins says over $2500 US dollars for your coin in extra fine (XF) condition. Your coin is considerably higher grade than XF. MS61 is a lofty uncirculated grade. Not only that, your coin contains 0.78 Troy ounces of pure gold, so a base value would be about $1075 in today's gold market.

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New Zealand Crown (5 Shillings)  1953

Hi marg , there were 250,000 of these copper-nickel New Zealand 1 Crown(5 Shillings) coins minted that year commemorating the Coronation of British Queen Elizabeth II (1952). Here is what the coin catalogs say about these neat coins:

average circulated: $6.50 US dollars approximate catalog value
fully uncirculated: $10

Coin: 17633
Requested by: marg, Wed, 20-Aug-2014 09:56:36 GMT

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Bahrain 10 Dinar Commemoration of Independence  1971

Fi you have 10 Dinar COMMEMORATION OF INDEPENDENCE from the Kingdom of Bahrain. Bahrain is an Arabic island country in the Persian Gulf ruled by the Al Khalifa royal family. The archipelago attained its independence in 1971 from British protectorate. This beautiful coin is made of 22 carat gold (0.917 pure) and contains 0.4717 troy ounces of the precious metal.

There is not a lot of information available about this coin. The most comprehensive write-up is found on the Chard web site Tax Free Gold [Press Here], and CoinQuest thanks Chard for use of this coin photo.

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Medieval France Franc à Pied  1365

If it is a genuine coin, you have a valuable item. That's great. The gold coins come from medieval France during the reign of king Charles V 'the wise.' The inscriptions read KAROLVS (Charles) DI GR (by grace) FRAnCORV (France) REX (king) and VINCIT (conquer) REGNAT (govern) IMPERAT (rule).

The coin in our image comes from Künker GmbH & Co. in Osnabrück, Germany where it sold for 1500 euros, about $2000 US dollars, in a 2014 auction. This gives an idea of the value of these coins. I've seen them sell as low as $800 and as high as $7000, depending on condition and overall eye appeal. Each coin stands on its own merits, so assigning exact pricing is essentially impossible. One thing is for sure: it is a valuable coin. Take your coin to a knowledgeable collector or professional coin dealer for an in-person inspection. If you would like to send us pictures, we may be able to estimate value with some accuracy. To do this, start an e-mail exchange with CoinQuest.

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Tue, 02-Sep-2014 18:52:14 GMT, unknown: 1975598