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Mexico 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 Reales (Ferdinand)  1809 to 1821Mexico 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 Reales (Ferdinand) 1809 to 1821 Germany 10 Pfennig (Iron or Zinc)  1916 to 1922Germany 10 Pfennig (Iron or Zinc) 1916 to 1922
Great Britain 1/3 Guinea  1797 to 1813Great Britain 1/3 Guinea 1797 to 1813 US Commemorative Half: Stone Mountain  1925US Commemorative Half: Stone Mountain 1925
Spain 5, 25, and 50 Pesetas  1957Spain 5, 25, and 50 Pesetas 1957 Switzerland 5 Franc  1922 to DateSwitzerland 5 Franc 1922 to Date
  

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US Morgan Silver Dollar  1878 to 1921

Hello Bianca -- You have a silver dollar designed by a man named George Morgan, so collectors call coins like yours Morgan Dollars. They are highly prized collectibles.

Your 1901O specimen is a 'common date' coin like most of the dates and mint marks in this series. 1921 is the most common of the common dates, as there were hundreds of millions of the 1921 coins made. Coins with better dates, not common dates, are listed below. They are more valuable.

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Mexico 8 Reales  1824 to 1897

Hi Deb -- You probably have a well-worn 8 reales coin from the old Republic of Mexico.

These coins contain 0.786 troy ounces of silver. So that sets the minimum value they can attain. For instance, if silver is selling at $12 per troy ounce (look it up for today's price at kitco.com), the minimum price is 0.786 x 12 = $9.40.

Coins with the liberty cap and starburst pattern were minted in smaller denominations than 8 reales. In fact, denominations of 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 reales look the same, only smaller. The denomination appears explicitly on the coin in the place where '8R' appears on the 8 reales. Look for '1/2R', '1R', '2R', or '4R' on your coin and, if you have one, click to this appraisal page.

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Canada 1 Cent Commemorative  1967

Yo, Ape -- Only if your coin is in superb numismatic (coin collector) condition, like the one in our picture, would a collector be willing to pay a premium for it. Maybe $1 or $2 US. Otherwise your coin is worth face value. It commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Confederation.

Coin: 2270
Requested by: ape, Mon, 14-Dec-2009 01:05:14 GMT

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France 50 Centimes, 1/2, 1, 2, and 5 Francs  1898 to Date

I like the designs on French coins, and this one is no exception. I am not sure if that is Miss Liberty, the French emblem Marianne, or just one of those pretty French women. The same pattern, however, has been used on-and-off for more than a century.

Here is a run-down of approximate catalog values for the various coins which use this pattern. For silver coins, they cannot be worth less than their weight in silver. Use kitco.com to find the current value of silver per troy ounce.

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US Confederate States 1 Cent  1861

Since less than 20 genuine Confederate States of American (CSA) cents were ever struck, Bobo, you probably have a replica of this famous coin.

The coin in our picture is a counterfeit. It sells for a few US dollars as a novelty piece. If it were genuine, the catalogs say its value would be $120,000!

The CSA also minted a half dollar. You can read about it at this CoinQuest link.

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Cayman Islands 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 Cents and 1 Dollar  1972 to Date

These are neat coins. Since the Cayman Islands are a British colony, the reigning British monarch appears on the front of all coins. On the reverse, however, the designs are varied. Those of the Cayman Islands are especially artistic designs, and the good part is that it does not take a lot of money to assemble a nice collection of them.

This page applies to all Cayman denominations of one dollar and less.

ONE CENT 1972 to Date: bronze, great Caiman thrush

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US Ellis Island Dollar (Counterfeit)  1906

Today's minting technology is really something. Mints around the world produce coins with literally breathtaking appeal and beauty. People buy these coins as collectable items, but, with very few exceptions, they hold almost no potential of strong growth in value. Their price is usually pumped up by marketing hype, so you pay way too much for them in the first place, making it almost impossible to realize a profit after, say, 20 years. If you buy a modern commemorative coin that's great. They make terrific collectibles and gifts, but buy them because you like them, not because they may be valuable some day. They won't.

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Medal: Great Britain Prince Charles Edward MEA RES AGITUR  1749

This is a medal struck to foster Jacobitism in England, Scotland and Ireland, which was a movement to install James II of England on the throne, even though he was Roman Catholic. There is a detailed summary of this rare medal at Classical Numismatic Group. The CNG medal is silver (and even more valuable) than the more prevalent bronze medals.

The medal in our picture comes from Baldwin's in London where it sold for 520 British pounds (about $800 US dollars) during a 2011 auction.

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