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US Gold Buffalo  2008 to DateUS Gold Buffalo 2008 to Date Medal: Great Britain Royal Humane Society  1830 to 1900Medal: Great Britain Royal Humane Society 1830 to 1900
Token: India Ram Darbar Temple Ramatanka (Fakes are possible) Token: India Ram Darbar Temple Ramatanka (Fakes are possible) New Zealand 3 Pence  1933 to 1965New Zealand 3 Pence 1933 to 1965
East Africa 1/2, 1, 5, and 10 Cents  1907 to 1964East Africa 1/2, 1, 5, and 10 Cents 1907 to 1964 Germany (Regensburg) Half Thaler and Thaler  1754 to 1791Germany (Regensburg) Half Thaler and Thaler 1754 to 1791
Medieval Great Britain Helm (Edward III)  1327 to 1377Medieval Great Britain Helm (Edward III) 1327 to 1377 Token: Canada Royal Black Knights  1912 to DateToken: Canada Royal Black Knights 1912 to Date
  

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China Hupeh (Hu-Peh) 5, 10, 20, 50 Cents and 1 Dollar (Fakes are possible)  1894 to 1908

These old coins from China are quite interesting. The dragon is one of the favorite patterns. Conversion of the monetary units goes like this:

3.6 candareens = 5 cents
7.2 candareens = 10 cents
1 mace and 4.4 candareens = 20 cents
3 mace and 6 candareens = 50 cents
7 mace and 2 candareens = 1 dollar

The value of these coins is quite high, especially in well preserved condition.

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US Missing Clad Layer (Minting error)  1965 to Date

Nowadays not many people remember when silver coins actually circulated in America. Up to 1964, our silver coins ~ dimes, quarters, half dollars ~ were made of actual silver. A full 90 percent of each coin was pure silver. The remaining 10 percent was copper. Then, in 1964, the Federal Government decided, with the rest of the world (pretty much), to do away with precious metal in coins and strike them out of cheap alloys. Coins minted from 1965 until now have zero silver content. Dimes, quarters, and half dollars are made of copper with a thin clad layer of nickel.

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World Coins with Personal Counterstamps  1780 to 1930

Thomas Fuller, the prolific English author, once said

Fools' names, like fools' faces, Are often seen in public places.

There is nothing quite as public as coinage, and some people (Fuller's fools) like to affix their initials on coins. It's an old-time graffiti.

Sure enough, there are collectors who enjoy these old pieces, and, because there is collector demand, the price of coins with personal counterstamps goes up. But it does not go up too far.

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Netherlands 1, 2 1/2, and 5 Gulden (Straight Line Pattern)  1982 to 2001

These are nice coins from the Netherlands. The straight line patterns are quite distinct. 1, 2 1/2, and 5 gulden denominations were issued until the time that Euro coinage took over in 2001.

1 GULDEN: 1982 to 2001, nickel
2 1/2 GULDEN: 1982 to 2001, nickel
5 GULDEN: 1987 to 2001, bronze clad nickel

Some of the later date coins (post-1990) have lower mintages and catalogers have reflected this in pricing, assigning catalog values as high as $10 to $15 US dollars. We have not seen such high prices in actual auction results, so CoinQuest's best estimates of value are low, as follows:

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Great Britain Half Sovereign and Sovereign  1911 to 1932

Don't use metal polish to remove the spots, Meutia. That will ruin the value of your cool British coin. Be sure to handle your coin by its edges only. No fingerprints allowed!

It sounds like you have a gold sovereign from 1914. It could be a half sovereign, because the two coins look alike, only their size is different:

HALF SOVEREIGN: 19 mm diameter, 0.118 troy ounces gold
SOVEREIGN: 22 mm diameter, 0.235 troy ounces gold

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West Africa (Federation) 25 Francs  1980 to Date

The unusual fish-like pattern is a 'good luck' Taku. This symbol appears on all coins from the newly federated States of West Africa. The 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 franc coins are made of nickel and brass, so these coins are worth face value. Collectors might pay a small amount more for an uncirculated specimen.
It seems that some of these coins have two small fishes at the 1:00 position on the taku side. Other coins do not have these fish. At least for now, the presence or absence of the fish does not affect value. This can been seen by comparing auction prices on eBay.

Coin: 21042
Requested by: Carrie, Thu, 28-Apr-2016 02:09:12 GMT

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Tue, 03-May-2016 12:27:23 GMT, unknown: 13738299