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Token: China Zhao Cai Jin Bao with Dragon and Phoenix Token: China Zhao Cai Jin Bao with Dragon and Phoenix Token: Germany Glückspfennig (Lucky Penny) Token: Germany Glückspfennig (Lucky Penny)
Austria Ducat  1867 to 1915Austria Ducat 1867 to 1915 US Confederate Half Dollar (Fakes are possible)  1861US Confederate Half Dollar (Fakes are possible) 1861
Russia 5, 10, and 25 Roubles (Fakes are possible)  1895 to 1897Russia 5, 10, and 25 Roubles (Fakes are possible) 1895 to 1897 Hungary Ducat (Fakes are possible)  1731 to 1740Hungary Ducat (Fakes are possible) 1731 to 1740
Malaysia Straits Settlements 5, 10, 20, and 50 Cents  1871 to 1927Malaysia Straits Settlements 5, 10, 20, and 50 Cents 1871 to 1927 Belgium 5 and 10 Centimes  1861 to 1901Belgium 5 and 10 Centimes 1861 to 1901
  

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France 50 Centimes and 1 and 2 Francs  1931 to 1959

France issued coins with this pattern in three denominations and two metals: 50 centimes, 1 franc, and 2 francs denominations, and aluminum-bronze and aluminum metals. Most *common dates* of these old French coins carry little value, less than $1 US dollar in worn condition. If you can find one in fully uncirculated condition, the catalog value rises to $5 to $15. Your coin, sir or madam, dated 1941, is a common date.

These coins were minted in aluminum and aluminum-bronze, the latter sometimes mistaken for gold.

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Token: World Belly Dancer Money

I've seen one of these before! This is a little dangling token for a woman's dress meant to look like a gold coin. They are used widely throughout the Islamic world and India, almost exclusively for two purposes: belly dancers use them to look pretty and produce a jingling sound, and at weddings they are often used for dress decoration. The hole is from where it used to be fastened unto a dress, belt, veil, or other piece of clothing.

I do not recognize the design used for the side shown in the first image, but the side shown in the second image looks to imitate an Algerian silver budju of the late 19th century. This is a common design to imitate - I've seen another version with a mirror image of that design on the other side of the token.

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US Missing Clad Layer (Minting error)  1965 to Date

Nowadays not many people remember when silver coins actually circulated in America. Up to 1964, our silver coins ~ dimes, quarters, half dollars ~ were made of actual silver. A full 90 percent of each coin was pure silver. The remaining 10 percent was copper. Then, in 1964, the Federal Government decided, with the rest of the world (pretty much), to do away with precious metal in coins and strike them out of cheap alloys. Coins minted from 1965 until now have zero silver content. Dimes, quarters, and half dollars are made of copper with a thin clad layer of nickel.

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Ancient Greece Sasanian Empire Bahram I (Counterfeit)  271AD

This is a rather strange coin. The inscription, portrait and crown is that of the Sassanian king Bahram I, who reigned as shahanshah from 271 until 274 AD. But there is no known coin of Bahram which has a double circular inscription as displayed on requester Chuck's silver coin.

The only match is a known fake dinar (see this image from Tom Mallon). See the side-by-side comparison below. The known gold fake, however, is also a *perfect* match to Chuck's coin. On the reverse the gouge on the right side, stretching from the lower right of the fire altar through the waist of the right attendant, is present in exactly the same manner on both coins. However, the color of Chuck's coin is not gold, as would be expected. We can conclude that the same counterfeiter also produced silvery specimens to pass off as drachms. Interestingly, the flan looks cast while the image itself is struck unto the coin. This is the only explanation I see for the double strike on the obverse on Chuck's coin, an error not present on the coin in the linked image.

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US Trade Dollar Pattern (Counterfeit)  1873

Sure enough, Chris, that's a Trade Dollar pattern coin form 1873. If it were genuine, it would be worth a bundle. Bowers and Merina (now Stack's Bowers) had one at auction a few years ago, and it sold for more than $2000 US dollars.

Very likely you have a replica coin like the one in the picture from eBay seller ixwisdom. These are worth a few dollars.

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South Africa Half Penny and Penny  1923 to 1960

Hi Orrine -- You have a modern penny from South Africa, which was British until 1961. Since it is a British coin, the picture on the front shows the reigning monarch: George V, George VI, or Elizabeth II. These are nice, big, heavy collectible coins, and the sailing ship design on the reverse is a nice one.

In 1931 they changed the reading of the denomination of the coin from 1 PENNY to 1D, where 'D' is short for DENARIUS, a small coin from the ancient Roman Empire. The half penny shows 1/2D.

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Sat, 06-Feb-2016 02:33:41 GMT, unknown: 9081795